DeBary Hall reopens

DEBARY HALL

Upcoming events at DeBary Hall

Oct. 10

Free native plant walk at DeBary Hall

Get outside and enjoy nature! Learn about native shrubs, trees and how to use beauty berries to make insect repellent, all while walking the beautiful grounds at DeBary Hall Historic Site, 198 Sunrise Blvd.

Master Naturalist Holly Giles will lead a native plant walk at 9:30 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 10.

Participants should bring bottled water, wear comfortable shoes and bring sunscreen. Reservations are required and limited to 10 walkers; contact Education Coordinator Lisa Perez at 386-668-3840 or lperez@volusia.org.

Oct. 11

For goodness snakes!

What do you know about snakes in Central Florida?

Thirty-five of Florida’s 46 native species of snakes can be found in Central Florida. Discover Florida’s beautiful and interesting snake species with local author Marcia Meara at 1 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 11, at DeBary Hall Historic Site, 198 Sunrise Blvd.

Snakes are one of the most misunderstood group of animals in the world. Join Meara as she clears misconceptions and teaches easy ways to identify the many different species inhabiting the Central Florida region.

Attendance is limited to 15 persons to allow for social distancing. Advance registration is required; call 386-668-3840, ext. 21136.

Oct. 15

Bird is the word at DeBary Hall

DeBary Hall is not only a historic site but a bird sanctuary as well. Get to know Central Florida birds with WV Audubon Society member Eli Schaperow at 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 15, at DeBary Hall Historic Site, 198 Sunrise Blvd.

In this interactive presentation, you will learn about binoculars, spotting scopes and cameras as aids to study and enjoy birds.

As a board member of the West Volusia Audubon society, Schaperow leads over 30 birding field trips each year for those interested in birds and wildlife in general.

Attendance is limited to 15 persons to allow for social distancing. Advance registration is required; call 386-668-3840, ext. 21136.

Oct. 17

Learn about Western Hemisphere’s original people

Brian Polk will provide a whirlwind presentation traveling back 30,000 years, crossing the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, revealing some surprising facts and theories about the Western Hemisphere's original people and who might have contacted them. The lecture will take place at 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 17, at DeBary Hall Historic Site, 198 Sunrise Blvd.

When Columbus arrived in the Caribbean in 1492, the Americas and the islands were inhabited by hundreds of thousands of native people from the arctic to South America's tip. Polk will explain how those people got here, whether or not they crossed the Bering Strait 12,000 years ago, and why Mesoamerica cultures were more advanced compared to those in North America.

Polk was the DeLeon Springs State Park manager from 2005-2018, working in 14 parks at the state parks' central office in Tallahassee.

His presentation is part of the free Lemonade Lectures series, which is sponsored by Volusia County. Light refreshments and lemonade will be served.

Attendance is limited to 15 persons to allow for social distancing. Advance registration is required; call 386-668-3840, ext. 21136.

Free cultural bike tour from DeBary Hall to Lake Monroe

Take a free, guided bike tour from DeBary Hall Historic Site to Lake Monroe Park at 9 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 17.

The tour guide will explain the area’s history from the Native Americans who inhabited the region thousands of years ago, to the development of Gemini Springs Park and everything in between.

The nine-mile ride will include several stops along the way. Participants must bring a bicycle and helmet. Sunscreen and bottled water are also recommended.

Children over 12 are welcome if accompanied by an adult. Reservations are required and limited to 10 riders; contact Education Coordinator Lisa Perez at 386-668-3840 or lperez@volusia.org.

— Volusia County Community Information Marketing Specialist David Hunt