News

Mon
20
Nov

Turkey tips from the pros: Restaurant owners share secrets for the perfect bird

Perfect turnout — DeLand resident Lynne Coffey’s 2016 Thanksgiving turkey, made using tips from a friend, Collette Koop, who owns The Old House Cafe.    PHOTO ABOVE COURTESY LYNNE COFFEY, AT RIGHT BEACON FILE

Perfect turnout — DeLand resident Lynne Coffey’s 2016 Thanksgiving turkey, made using tips from a friend, Collette Koop, who owns The Old House Cafe.

PHOTO COURTESY LYNNE COFFEY

Collette Koop, shown here right at her restaurant, uses a basic blend of herb and spice, and something extra but easy, to produce a fragrant, flavorful, oh-so-tender turkey every time.  

Collette Koop, shown here right at her restaurant, uses a basic blend of herb and spice, and something extra but easy, to produce a fragrant, flavorful, oh-so-tender turkey every time.  

BEACON FILE

As talk turns to turkey, some are willing to share their tried-and-true twists on tasty turkey turnouts.

For this week’s Foodie File, The Beacon plucked four DeLand-area eatery owners willing to share interesting and effective prep and cooking tips.

 

Tender and tantalizing, from Old House Cafe

Frozen butter, a simple spice blend, a sprig of rosemary and an olive-oil coating make The Old House Cafe owner Collette Koop’s roasted turkey among the most memorable.

First step: Cut up a stick of butter, and place the pieces in the freezer for about 30 minutes.

Once the butter is frozen, push the pieces under the turkey’s skin. Distribute the butter pats evenly around the bird.

Rub the turkey inside and out with a mixture of olive oil, garlic, chopped green onion, salt and pepper. Place a sprig of rosemary inside the cavity.

Mon
20
Nov

More on the food-access front: Artisan Alley Market now accepts food stamps

Help from the feds — Deltona resident George Johnson, above, usually deals with ranchers and foresters in his work for the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service, but he also has helped put together community gardens in Pierson, Bunnell, Ormond Beach and now DeLand. “There’s all different ways that these work and who benefits from them,” Johnson said. In the photo below, Stetson University students prepare the plot for raised beds. 

Help from the feds — Deltona resident George Johnson, above, usually deals with ranchers and foresters in his work for the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service, but he also has helped put together community gardens in Pierson, Bunnell, Ormond Beach and now DeLand. “There’s all different ways that these work and who benefits from them,” Johnson said. In the photo below, Stetson University students prepare the plot for raised beds. 

BEACON PHOTO/BARB SHEPHERD

Level planting field — Volunteer Jim Jackson levels the dirt in one of 39 raised beds in the South Delaware Avenue community garden, in preparation for planting. Residents can lease the fertile, irrigated beds for $20 a year, which includes soil, water, plants, tools and expert gardening advice. It’s a project spearheaded by Stetson University’s Center for Community Engagement, designed to increase Spring Hill residents’ access to fresh vegetables.

Level planting field — Volunteer Jim Jackson levels the dirt in one of 39 raised beds in the South Delaware Avenue community garden, in preparation for planting. Residents can lease the fertile, irrigated beds for $20 a year, which includes soil, water, plants, tools and expert gardening advice. It’s a project spearheaded by Stetson University’s Center for Community Engagement, designed to increase Spring Hill residents’ access to fresh vegetables.

BEACON PHOTO/BARB SHEPHERD

The Artisan Alley Friday Night Growers and Makers Market is now able to accept food stamps. And, thanks to a special program, food-stamp users can double their money when they shop at the market.

The food-stamp program is known officially as SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program). Recipients use SNAP debit cards to buy food. At the Friday-night market, they can use their cards at a central location to buy tokens, which can be used for purchasing fresh produce, bread and other food items sold at the market.

Qualifying the market for SNAP benefits was a project of the Stetson University Center for Community Engagement, as another way to increase access to fresh, healthful foods for residents of the Spring Hill neighborhood of DeLand. Another project with the same goal is the community garden underway on South Delaware Avenue. 

Mon
20
Nov

Planting seeds in a ‘food desert’

It takes a village — DeLand chef and restaurant owner Hari Pulapaka works as a volunteer Oct. 28, installing irrigation in one of the raised beds in the Spring Hill community garden. Pulapaka has long promoted the use of fresh, locally grown produce in his acclaimed Downtown DeLand restaurant, Cress. In back, Stetson University students get their work assignments.

It takes a village — DeLand chef and restaurant owner Hari Pulapaka works as a volunteer Oct. 28, installing irrigation in one of the raised beds in the Spring Hill community garden. Pulapaka has long promoted the use of fresh, locally grown produce in his acclaimed Downtown DeLand restaurant, Cress. In back, Stetson University students get their work assignments.

BEACON PHOTO/BARB SHEPHERD

Happy to help — Stetson University senior Le’Cendra Kendrick, whose home is in Michigan, is among a dozen or more Stetson students helping set up a community garden in the Spring Hill neighborhood of DeLand Oct. 28. “It’s something I thought was very important,” Kendrick said.

Happy to help — Stetson University senior Le’Cendra Kendrick, whose home is in Michigan, is among a dozen or more Stetson students helping set up a community garden in the Spring Hill neighborhood of DeLand Oct. 28. “It’s something I thought was very important,” Kendrick said.

BEACON PHOTO/BARB SHEPHERD

Spring Hill neighbors get a community garden

 

Stetson University student Madilyn Amico carried buckets of soil in the hot afternoon sun, helping build a community garden for DeLand residents who lack access to fresh fruits and vegetables.

A 2016 study by Stetson assistant professor Dr. Asal Mohamadi Johnson and her senior-research students found 90 percent of the residents in Spring Hill were concerned about the lack of fresh produce available there.

Those findings surprised Amico, a sophomore who was volunteering for her first time at Stetson.

“It’s crazy because in my hometown every street has a fresh produce organic market or there’s a community garden just around the corner,” the communications and media-studies major from Stuart said. “I think it’s great that this is here for the entire community to access.”

Mon
20
Nov

He wants to reclaim Persimmon Hollow, one seedling at a time

The ‘Johnny Appleseed’ of persimmons — DeLandite Lorenzo Bizzio plants Turkey Lake persimmon seedlings in the backyard of a home on East New York Avenue. The blue liquid in the jar next to him is diluted plant fertilizer. Bizzio hopes to help DeLand reclaim its “Persimmon Hollow” identity.

The ‘Johnny Appleseed’ of persimmons — DeLandite Lorenzo Bizzio plants Turkey Lake persimmon seedlings in the backyard of a home on East New York Avenue. The blue liquid in the jar next to him is diluted plant fertilizer. Bizzio hopes to help DeLand reclaim its “Persimmon Hollow” identity.

BEACON PHOTO/TOM STEVENS

As dusk approached Nov. 5, Lorenzo Bizzio went about planting persimmon trees in the backyard of a house on East New York Avenue in DeLand, where a small orange grove had thrived before falling victim to a tree-killing disease several years ago.

Bizzio, 22, was planting the trees to show his appreciation for a favor done for him by the property owner, Dot Brown. 

But to Bizzio, the kind gesture was also part of a larger vision. Though just weedy-looking seedlings now, these particular persimmon trees bear a special promise for the future. They’ll produce a distinctly flavored fruit, different from other persimmons.

Typically, Florida persimmons are tart, Bizzio said, not very tasty on most people’s palates. In the trees Bizzio is planting, Mother Nature mixed just the right genomes to produce a sweeter variety of the Florida persimmon species, Diospyros virginiana.

It’s like “a caramel with lots of nutmeg and clove and spice,” Bizzio said. 

Fri
17
Nov

West Volusia Calendar of Events Nov. 18-25, 2017

Saturday, Nov. 18
 
Barberville Family Farm Swap and Market
7 a.m.-12:30 p.m. west of Barberville Pioneer Settlement, three-fourths of a mile west of U.S. Highway 17, on State Road 40, Barberville. Call 386-469-9409.
 
Farmers Market
7 a.m.-3 p.m. at 535 Fair St., off West State Road 44, at the intersection of Carlis Road and Fair Street, DeLand.
 
Farmers Market
8 a.m.-1 p.m. at Gateway Center for the Arts, 880 North U.S. Highway 17-92, DeBary. Call 407-443-6965.
 
Market in the Park
8 a.m.-1 p.m. at Blake Park, 437 S. Lakeview Drive, Lake Helen. Call 305-393-0682.
 
Low-Cost Pet-Shot Clinic
Wed
15
Nov

Stetson vet shares lessons from Vietnam War

Distinguished professor — Stetson University Professor Emeritus T. Wayne Bailey, pictured here with Savannah-Jane Griffin, Stetson’s director of community engagement, was one of then-future U.S. Sen. Max Cleland’s professors while Cleland was a Stetson student in the 1960s. 

Distinguished professor — Stetson University Professor Emeritus T. Wayne Bailey, pictured here with Savannah-Jane Griffin, Stetson’s director of community engagement, was one of then-future U.S. Sen. Max Cleland’s professors while Cleland was a Stetson student in the 1960s. 

BEACON PHOTO/AL EVERSON

There was no generation gap in an audience that gathered Nov. 14 to hear one of Stetson University’s most distinguished alumni reflect on the Vietnam War.

“The year is 1967. Now what?” Stetson Professor Emeritus T. Wayne Bailey said, as he set the stage for former U.S. Sen. Max Cleland, D-Georgia, a triple amputee of the war, to talk to the group by speakerphone.

It was a time when the U.S. was deeply involved in battling communism in Southeast Asia, but American leaders wanted to avoid a direct confrontation with the Soviet Union and Communist China. The American public generally supported the Vietnam War effort then, as troop levels in the war zone topped the half-million mark and draft calls increased. U.S. leaders assured the nation the communist enemy was close to the breaking point, but the war continued and American casualties were rising.

Wed
15
Nov

War vet weds while walking parade

Newlyweds — Mark and Lee Panageotes, who got married while marching in the Volusia County Veterans Day Parade in Downtown DeLand Nov. 11, seal their nuptials with a kiss, just as the clock strikes 11:11:11.

Newlyweds — Mark and Lee Panageotes, who got married while marching in the Volusia County Veterans Day Parade in Downtown DeLand Nov. 11, seal their nuptials with a kiss, just as the clock strikes 11:11:11.

PHOTO BY JACQUELYN JOHNSTON

Mark and Lee Panageotes were lucky enough to tie the knot before a crowd of thousands of cheering people.

It’s not because the couple have enough friends to fill a small stadium. Rather, the two were wed during the Volusia County Veterans Day Parade, held Nov. 11 in Downtown DeLand.

“I’m from New Hampshire and was divorced a number of years ago. I came down to Sebring and have been going in and out of Sebring the past six years,” said Mark Panageotes. “[Lee and I] met last year, and we kind of wanted to put a special touch on this.”

Being a Vietnam War veteran, serving in the Army from 1968 to 1977, Mark Panageotes figured getting married in a Veterans Day parade might be just the “special touch” the couple needed.

The couple were in Daytona Beach for a classic car racing event Veterans Day weekend, and they decided to research who in the area might be having a parade.

Wed
15
Nov

Tobacco trial underway in Historic Courthouse

Testimony in tobacco trial — During a break in the trial, Judge Dennis Craig of the 7th Judicial Circuit talks to expert witness Robert N. Proctor Nov. 9 in the Volusia County Historic Courthouse. The case, Quackenbush v. R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., came out of a massive class-action suit that went to the Florida Supreme Court, where the court’s ruling resulted in class members — plaintiffs who had filed together in the class-action suit — filing thousands of individual lawsuits against cigarette manufacture

Testimony in tobacco trial — During a break in the trial, Judge Dennis Craig of the 7th Judicial Circuit talks to expert witness Robert N. Proctor Nov. 9 in the Volusia County Historic Courthouse. The case, Quackenbush v. R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., came out of a massive class-action suit that went to the Florida Supreme Court, where the court’s ruling resulted in class members — plaintiffs who had filed together in the class-action suit — filing thousands of individual lawsuits against cigarette manufacturers.

BEACON PHOTO/ERIKA WEBB

A lawsuit against tobacco giant R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. has generated unusual activity at the Volusia County Historic Courthouse in Downtown DeLand.

Some onlookers wondered what was going on in the old justice center, now home to the Volusia County Elections Office and the county’s Fire Services administration.

These days, trials are rarely in session there. 

Across the street from the Historic Courthouse, next to the old jail, parking spaces were reserved for jurors. 

Jury selection began Nov. 6; opening statements and evidence were presented Nov. 8 in a civil lawsuit filed by a Deltona resident against the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.

The plaintiff, Kathleen Marie Quackenbush, is personal representative for the estate of her late husband, Robert Quackenbush.

He died from lung cancer in 1998. He was 49. 

Wed
15
Nov

DeLand boots elves out of annual Christmas contest

On duty for Christmas contest — Toy soldiers like this one (but much smaller) will be hidden in DeLand shops beginning Monday, Nov. 20, for Mistletoe March, a rebranding of the former Elf Patrol. The monthlong scavenger hunt is a Downtown DeLand holiday tradition.

On duty for Christmas contest — Toy soldiers like this one (but much smaller) will be hidden in DeLand shops beginning Monday, Nov. 20, for Mistletoe March, a rebranding of the former Elf Patrol. The monthlong scavenger hunt is a Downtown DeLand holiday tradition.

BEACON PHOTO/TOM STEVENS

The elves have been fired, so to speak. But, never fear. Toy soldiers have stepped up to serve.

Annually for several years, children and their families have enjoyed “Elf Patrol,” a monthlong holiday scavenger hunt that has people trying to find hidden elves in DeLand shops. The fun finale includes a party where children and adults alike can win prizes.

This year, the scavenger hunt will be called “Mistletoe March,” and participants will search for toy soldiers.

Elf Patrol — now Mistletoe March — is a cooperative venture between the MainStreet DeLand Association and The Muse Book Shop.

MainStreet’s decision to change the object of the fun hunt is part of a goal to conform Downtown DeLand’s Christmas decorations around a single theme. Prominent among those decorations are the fiberglass toy soldiers, made by jail inmates, that stand at attention on Downtown DeLand street corners.

Wed
15
Nov

DeLand businesses keep beach tidy

IN THE BAG — Melissa Garcia and Hilde Marie Petterson show the bags of trash they collected at the ocean’s edge near New Smyrna Beach, in a Nov. 12 cleanup sponsored by two Downtown DeLand businesses.

IN THE BAG — Melissa Garcia and Hilde Marie Petterson show the bags of trash they collected at the ocean’s edge near New Smyrna Beach, in a Nov. 12 cleanup sponsored by two Downtown DeLand businesses.

BEACON PHOTO/DEVON RUSSELL

HAPPY TO HELP — Volunteers line up to register for a beach cleanup hosted Nov. 12 by two DeLand businesses: Outsiders USA and Persimmon Hollow Brewing Co. Ultimately, nearly 300 people took part, coming from as far as Orlando and Sanford to help.

HAPPY TO HELP — Volunteers line up to register for a beach cleanup hosted Nov. 12 by two DeLand businesses: Outsiders USA and Persimmon Hollow Brewing Co. Ultimately, nearly 300 people took part, coming from as far as Orlando and Sanford to help.

BEACON PHOTO/SHAWN STEWART

Nearly 300 volunteers show up to help

A new partnership between one of Downtown DeLand’s newest businesses and DeLand’s brewery is cleaning up.

Outsiders USA and Persimmon Hollow Brewing Co. hosted a beach cleanup Nov. 12, and plan many more similar events. Participation in the beach cleaning exceeded expectations.

The individuals involved in the two businesses share similar values, and decided to put those values into action.

“We all want to do our best to take care of this world and leave it better than we found it,” Andy Sistrunk of Persimmon Hollow said.

This team plans to host cleanup events every four to six weeks throughout the end of 2017 and in 2018. The next one is planned Sunday, Dec. 3, in Downtown DeLand.

The first highly successful cleanup took place in New Smyrna Beach. Almost 300 people showed up.

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