News

Mon
25
Sep

FOODIE FILE: The Baker’s Table is a culinary gem in New Smyrna Beach

Love and business — The Baker’s Table owners and operators Jeanette Quintana and Jaime Quintana, wife and husband, smile for a picture in front of their bar at the New Smyrna Beach restaurant. Jeanette is the pastry chef and manages the front of the house. Jaime is the executive chef and creates some mind-blowing flavors in his diverse selection of dishes. A very talented couple.

Love and business — The Baker’s Table owners and operators Jeanette Quintana and Jaime Quintana, wife and husband, smile for a picture in front of their bar at the New Smyrna Beach restaurant. Jeanette is the pastry chef and manages the front of the house. Jaime is the executive chef and creates some mind-blowing flavors in his diverse selection of dishes. A very talented couple.

PHOTO COURTESY JEANETTE QUINTANA

Classic pairing — At the many restaurants where I’ve worked, my chefs said if you have the chance to put foie gras on a filet, you should. Foie gras is a delicacy composed of either duck or goose liver that has been fattened. At The Baker’s Table, this combination is served with truffle mashed potatoes and sauteed spinach.

Classic pairing — At the many restaurants where I’ve worked, my chefs said if you have the chance to put foie gras on a filet, you should. Foie gras is a delicacy composed of either duck or goose liver that has been fattened. At The Baker’s Table, this combination is served with truffle mashed potatoes and sauteed spinach.

Vegetarian dream — The Baker’s Table appetizer of warm goat cheese tart with caramelized onions, walnuts and truffle honey is topped with an apple-shallot relish. It’s so rich and flavorful that I could barely contain myself. 

Vegetarian dream — The Baker’s Table appetizer of warm goat cheese tart with caramelized onions, walnuts and truffle honey is topped with an apple-shallot relish. It’s so rich and flavorful that I could barely contain myself. 

The windows are down, the sun is shining brightly, and a calm ocean breeze dances in and out of the car as I pull in at 4154 S. Atlantic Ave. in New Smyrna Beach.  

I feel as if I’ve found hidden treasure just off the beach. I can hear ocean waves breaking as I walk to the door, passing the relaxed outdoor patio setting.  

Two steps into the restaurant, I feel the love and friendliness radiating from the employees and smiling guests who sit at the perfectly set tables, draped with white linen. This is The Baker’s Table.

Husband and wife owners Jaime and Jeanette Quintana opened The Baker’s Table in March 2016, and have been gaining popularity and regulars ever since they took over a German-style deli at that location.  

Fri
22
Sep

West Volusia Calendar of Events Sept. 23-30, 2017

Saturday, Sept. 23
 
Smithsonian Magazine Museum Day Live
Local museums will offer free admission for the day. They include the DeLand House Museum, the DeLand Naval Air Station Museum, the Museum of Art - DeLand, Stetson University's Gillespie Museum and Hand Art Center. Free tickets must be presented; visit www.smithsonianmag.com/museumday/museum-day-live-2017/tickets.
 
Farmers Market
8 a.m.-1 p.m. at Gateway Center for the Arts, 880 North U.S. Highway 17-92, DeBary. Call 407-443-6965.
 
Market in the Park
8 a.m.-1 p.m. at Blake Park, 437 S. Lakeview Drive, Lake Helen. Call 305-393-0682.
 
Dog Show
Thu
21
Sep

Two arrested in 2016 Candlelight Oaks killings

Charles Martin IV, 20 (left), of DeLand, and Jevon L. Dennis, 22, of Deltona

Charles Martin IV, 20 (left), of DeLand, and Jevon L. Dennis, 22, of Deltona

DeLand police have arrested two men in connection with a 2016 shooting at a party in the Candlelight Oaks neighborhood that left two people dead and one injured.

Charles Martin IV, 20, of DeLand, and Jevon L. Dennis, 22, of Deltona, both face second-degree murder charges.

The two men are already in jail. Dennis was most recently arrested for violating his probation on an earlier burglary charge, while Martin has been in jail since March in connection with an armed robbery and drug possession.

Wed
20
Sep

Harder test contributes to teacher shortage

A harder test could be contributing to a teacher shortage in Volusia County and around the state.

A harder test could be contributing to a teacher shortage in Volusia County and around the state.

More would-be teachers can’t pass required test

Volusia County Schools hired 348 teachers for the 2017-18 school year, but even after classes were underway, 15 vacancies remained.

Since required tests were made more rigorous in 2014, it’s getting hard to find candidates who have passed the Florida Teacher Certification Exam. 

Teachers allowed to start work on temporary certificates are getting the boot when they can’t pass. It happened to 73 Volusia County teachers this summer. 

In August, school district Chief Human Resources Officer Dana Paige-Pender explained the challenges to the Volusia County School Board. 

She said there are critical instructor shortages in exceptional-student education, technology education, and science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) areas.

Teachers for English and language arts also are scarce, she said.

Wed
20
Sep

Surviving the storm, emotionally

Life disrupted — Carole and George Tattrie load up their cat Simoney Baloney and head home after weathering Hurricane Irma in their Downtown DeLand business, Plexus Inc., a uniform-supply and embroidery shop in the Conrad complex. Across West Volusia, thousands of people like the Tattries put their normal lives on hold for days or even weeks, to prepare for and recover after Irma’s visit. As Erika Webb’s story discusses, such disruption can cause stress and anxiety that may have lingering effects.

Life disrupted — Carole and George Tattrie load up their cat Simoney Baloney and head home after weathering Hurricane Irma in their Downtown DeLand business, Plexus Inc., a uniform-supply and embroidery shop in the Conrad complex. Across West Volusia, thousands of people like the Tattries put their normal lives on hold for days or even weeks, to prepare for and recover after Irma’s visit. As Erika Webb’s story discusses, such disruption can cause stress and anxiety that may have lingering effects.

BEACON PHOTO/MARSHA MCLAUGHLIN

As Floridians pick themselves up and restore their sense of normalcy, Irma joins Andrew, Katrina, Sandy, Harvey and others in the annals of terrifying hurricanes.

People throughout the state spent nearly a week before Irma’s arrival watching as the predicted path shifted from one side of the state to the other, and either tried to escape or prepared to ride out one of the largest and strongest hurricanes in recorded history. 

Fear of the unknown is one thing. Fear of the known can be quite another. 

DeLand resident Jeanne Savoie survived Hurricane Andrew in 1992 and moved north, right into the paths of Charley, Frances and Jeanne, who would roar through her life 12 years later. 

To say that Savoie was not particularly looking forward to Irma’s arrival would be an understatement.

But, having worked for many years as a licensed mental-health therapist, and as a proponent of natural self-healing, she was ready for Irma.

Wed
20
Sep

Fighting the dark: Lack of power — and information — frustrates residents, officials

WORKING HARD TO GET THE POWER FLOWING — Two linemen, from the AEP Southwestern Electric Power Company in Marshall, Texas, work Sept. 20 to repair an electrical line on North Woodland Boulevard near Mandarin Avenue. Duke Energy and other electric utilities in Florida brought in thousands of linemen from outside the state to help repair the damage caused by Hurricane Irma.

WORKING HARD TO GET THE POWER FLOWING — Two linemen, from the AEP Southwestern Electric Power Company in Marshall, Texas, work Sept. 20 to repair an electrical line on North Woodland Boulevard near Mandarin Avenue. Duke Energy and other electric utilities in Florida brought in thousands of linemen from outside the state to help repair the damage caused by Hurricane Irma.

BEACON PHOTO/MARSHA McLAUGHLIN

More than a week after Hurricane Irma blew through West Volusia — and days after when Duke Energy first said it would have all the county’s electricity back on — thousands of West Volusia residents were still in the dark.

A day after the storm moved out of the area, the utility estimated Sept. 12 power would be restored to "essentially all" customers in Volusia County by midnight Sept. 17.

That day came and went, and many West Volusians were left frustrated, wondering when their power would return. As of 9 a.m. Sept. 18, there were still 13,756 Duke customers, along with 4,690 Florida Power & Light customers, without power.

By noon Sept. 19, that number had dropped to 3,144 Duke and 230 FP&L customers.

Duke Energy is the main electric utility for most of West Volusia, with the exception of eastern portions of Deltona, southern portions of DeBary, and areas of far Northwest Volusia.

Wed
20
Sep

Meeting on RaceTrac rescheduled due to Irma

The site of a new proposed RaceTrac gas station, at the corner of East New York Avenue (State Road 44) and Kepler Road near DeLand.

The site of a new proposed RaceTrac gas station, at the corner of East New York Avenue (State Road 44) and Kepler Road near DeLand.

A hearing on RaceTrac Petroleum’s request to build a convenience store with as many as 14 gasoline pumps at a busy intersection on DeLand’s east side will take place next month. 

The Volusia County Planning and Land Development Regulation Commission was supposed to consider the company’s proposal to construct the retail facility on the southeast corner of East New York Avenue (State Road 44) and Kepler Road Sept. 12, but the magnitude of Hurricane Irma and her aftermath disrupted the schedule. 

The new time and date for the public hearing are 9 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 3, in the County Council Chambers of the Thomas C. Kelly County Administration Center, 123 W. Indiana Ave., DeLand.

The property in question is in the unincorporated area of the county. 

The site is already zoned for commercial activity, but RaceTrac is asking for a business planned-unit development (BPUD) zoning. 

Wed
20
Sep

Sheriff's deputies investigating human remains at fernery

Crime-scene tape was seen across the entrance to a fernery Wednesday on Daugharty Road near DeLeon Springs.

Crime-scene tape was seen across the entrance to a fernery Wednesday on Daugharty Road near DeLeon Springs.

BEACON PHOTO/ERIKA WEBB

Volusia County Sheriff's deputies are investigating human remains discovered by a worker at a fernery near DeLeon Springs.

"Deputies responded around 10:47 a.m. Wednesday to a fernery off the 4500 block of Daugharty Road (which becomes Marsh Road further south), DeLeon Springs, after a worker reported discovering some bones on the property," said Sheriff's Office spokesman Andrew Gant. "The bones appeared to be human remains, but confirmation and identification will depend on a closer examination by the medical examiner. Sheriff's detectives are investigating, and no further information is available at this time."

A Beacon reporter saw about 10 Sheriff's Office vehicles near the site of the incident Wednesday afternoon. 

This story is developing. Check back for more details. 

 

Wed
20
Sep

Ramos joins Deltona commission

Victor Ramos at the Sept. 18 meeting of the Deltona City Commission

Victor Ramos at the Sept. 18 meeting of the Deltona City Commission

The Deltona City Commission now is up to full strength.

Six members of the City Commission on Sept. 18 tapped Victor Ramos to fill the vacancy created by the resignation of District 5 Commissioner Brian Soukup. Ramos’ appointment brings to the full seven the number of elected leaders in Deltona. 

The city’s charter calls for untimely vacancies to be filled by appointment by the remaining members of the commission. Ramos was immediately sworn into office. 

Soukup abruptly quit last month, citing frustration with city policies and an inability to bring issues to the fore for discussion with and among fellow elected officials. 

Ramos, who is director of Bethune-Cookman University’s Deltona branch campus, ran for the commission post in 2014, but was defeated by Soukup. He will serve at least until November 2018. 

“I want to bring opportunities, not just to our residents, but also to our businesses. I want to see where I can help,” Ramos said.

Wed
20
Sep

STORM DEBRIS: Collection has begun in DeLand, OC, and unincorporated Volusia County

Collection begins — Debris knocked down by Hurricane Irma lines both sides of John Thomas Avenue in DeLand Sept. 13.

Collection begins — Debris knocked down by Hurricane Irma lines both sides of John Thomas Avenue in DeLand Sept. 13.

BEACON PHOTO/MARSHA MCLAUGHLIN

In DeLand, contractors began removing debris from Irma along city-maintained roadways Sept. 20, starting with some of the harder-hit areas.

“Residents of impacted areas that can safely do so are asked to place any storm-generated debris on the public right of way. Please try not to block the roadway itself,” city spokesman Chris Graham said. “The public right of way is the area of residential property that extends from the street to the sidewalk, ditch, utility pole or easement. Residents are urged to ensure set-out debris is only vegetative and not mixed with any other types of debris or garbage.”

The city asked residents to avoid placing debris near water-meter vaults, fire hydrants or any other aboveground utilities.

Volusia County began debris collection on Sept. 20 as well, for county-maintained roads in unincorporated areas and certain county-maintained roads that run through cities.

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