Columnists

Fri
03
Nov

Al Everson: Remembering those who suffer for conscience

Al Everson

Al Everson

For those who care, Sunday, Nov. 5, is the International Day of Prayer for the Persecuted Church.

The group known as The Voice of the Martyrs is calling upon the faithful to lift up their fellow Christians in lands where liberty of conscience and freedom of worship do not exist.

Christians in America may want to shy away from pondering or even acknowledging that their brothers and sisters in the faith in other countries — notably North Korea, Communist China, Vietnam, Iraq, Pakistan, Iran, etc. — are suffering for professing their faith in and allegiance to Jesus Christ. For those of us who have lived sheltered lives safely behind the ramparts of liberty, it is so easy to ignore — and maybe really not even care about — the oppression, persecution and danger to their own lives and the lives of their families faced by Christians in intolerant lands.

Fri
03
Nov

Tanner Andrews: Detecting the truly needy

Tanner Andrews

Tanner Andrews

If we are honest about it, we admit that no one really likes homeless people. Bums, winos, however you denote them, people are not fond of the less fortunate.

Panhandling makes them even less popular. We may have a Christian duty, but it is not always easy to carry out. And, consider the moral hazard.

Give a bum a few bucks, there is essentially no chance that the money will go for green vegetables or other healthful food. If he does not buy grease-burgers, he may buy some cheap alcohol and wander off to the woods.

That same moral hazard is hidden if not ameliorated when we engage in corporate welfare. Give the France family a few million; there will be expensive booze in the luxury boxes. Politicians get invited, everyone has a good time, and the cops carefully avoid seeing them drive home.

Fri
27
Oct

Letters to the Editor: On truth, the flag, and empathy

Letters to the Editor

Our nation needs the truth

Editor, The Beacon:

Bravo, Mr. (Russ) White! My hat’s off to you, sir, for your continued reference to our idiot king as President Drumpf — the original spelling of his name.

Please continue with your insightful, well-written, and factually accurate coverage of the malignant clown in the White House.

The nation needs to know the truth to ultimately wipe itself clean of his corruptions and cruelty, and those of his billionaire minions and slimy appointees.

I respect the office of the presidency more than I can say, and I consider the Founding Fathers as brilliant and enlightened philosopher/leaders.

Fri
27
Oct

David Rauschenberger: Obama allowed uranium-mining sale to Russians

David Rauschenberger

David Rauschenberger

How many of my good friends in The Beacon leaning left-of-center know about the Russian uranium scandal? I’m wondering, after reading Andrew C. McCarthy’s article in National Review (hat tip to my buddy, Dave).

And what puzzles me is how Democrats in Congress and the mainstream media can ignore this story, while trying to pin fake collusion charges on anyone they can close to President Donald Trump. It’s a case study in hypocrisy and bias, but that’s for another column.

McCarthy asserts that the big fish is former President Barack Obama. And nobody’s surprised that the Clintons cashed in. But I’m guessing nobody in The Beacon audience will come to their defense. Heck, Hillary just made them miserable for eight years!

Fri
27
Oct

Tanner Andrews: The new corporate-welfare king

Tanner Andrews

Tanner Andrews

Move over, France family, we have new royalty in the corporate-welfare department. Can you say “hi” to King Hyatt Brown? County Chair Ed Kelley sure can!

Looking over his campaign report from the last election cycle, I'd guess he said “hi” to Hyatt pretty regularly. They sometimes call that a Chicago handshake.

Nor was Kelley the only one. A quick peek at the campaign listings reveals how the Browns use several corporate names to skirt contribution limits, and that several council critters benefited handsomely. They said hi to Hyatt frequently; that old crinkling handshake worked pretty well.

I am sure the Brown family expressed their views on welfare. Welfare should not be for the poor, who are insufficiently appreciative. Welfare should be for those who have money to share.

Fri
27
Oct

Cameron's Chronicles: AKA works to enrich Black Heritage Gallery

AKA TAU CHI OMEGA CHAPTER MEMBERS — In the photo above, in back, from left, are DeLonda Singleton, Idella Reese, Beaulah Blanks, President Kendra McNeil, Crystal Jones and Vice President Johnnie Chavis. In front, from left, are Minerva Small, Mary Bradley, Latrecia Kennedy, Dorothy Gibson, Irma May and Carol Thames. At right is the current exhibit, and at lower right is the Burgess Building in Bill Dreggors Park, 230 N. Stone St. in DeLand.

AKA TAU CHI OMEGA CHAPTER MEMBERS — In the photo here, in back, from left, are DeLonda Singleton, Idella Reese, Beaulah Blanks, President Kendra McNeil, Crystal Jones and Vice President Johnnie Chavis. In front, from left, are Minerva Small, Mary Bradley, Latrecia Kennedy, Dorothy Gibson, Irma May and Carol Thames.

PHOTOS COURTESY CRYSTAL JONES

The current West Volusia Black Heritage Gallery exhibit

The current West Volusia Black Heritage Gallery exhibit

In partnership with the Black Heritage Gallery Committee, the Tau Chi Omega Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority is working to restructure the West Volusia Black Heritage Gallery in a DeLand park.

The gallery, in Burgess Historical Building II in Bill Dreggors Park in DeLand, was organized by Tau Chi Omega Chapter in 1993-94, according to Crystal L. Jones, an AKA member and resident of West Volusia. 

The gallery currently showcases the history of the impact of African-Americans in West Volusia, and includes information about doctors, educators, musicians, athletes and numerous entrepreneurs who helped to enhance education, business, the arts and medicine.

The Burgess Building was the hospital for African-American residents in Volusia County from the 1930s to the 1950s. 

Fri
20
Oct

Tanner Andrews: Checking in with the junk mailers

Tanner Andrews

Tanner Andrews

Advertising is a touchy business. The potential vendor has to manage to attract my attention, and motivate me to pull out the wallet.

Both elements are important. Attention alone does little good. If they get me sore, instead of sending money, I go and pour gasoline into their beer, failing their mission.

Contrariwise, if they would have gotten to my wallet, but for being ignored, they have failed as to the other element.

With that in mind, I turn to the morning’s mail. It is not an encouraging day for advertisers.

Let’s start with this advertisement from Deluxe. Through a window envelope, on curiously patterned paper, we see “pay to the order of.”

Oh, boy! A check! Let’s open it and see how much! Well, actually, it is just an ad, formatted to mislead the recipient.

That is a great way to build trust — lie to me. The mailer tells me that a large number of business owners rely on Deluxe.

Fri
20
Oct

David Rauschenberger: Centralized control causes service to deteriorate

David Rauschenberger

David Rauschenberger

Per usual, I enjoyed Tanner Andrews’ most recent column. 

He was pointing out that Hurricane Irma was the first real Duke outage that mattered to the peeps. I’m here to offer my perspective. But I need to tie one thing up first.

I’ve never denied the climate is changing. And that’s where my critics falter. They don’t enter the arena of ideas with me. They ignore my challenge for them to prove that man is predominantly causing obvious changes in the climate, that the historical data isn’t being manipulated, and that they can alter the future.

They tell you I don’t believe in climate change. Yes, I do. They’re just wrong about man’s contribution to the changes and man’s ability to control the climate. They require blind obedience. And I, for one, don’t think their projections are credible.

Fri
20
Oct

Russ White: Why would anyone trust our current White House?

Russ White

Russ White

It seems as if our president has no guiding agenda of his own, except to destroy everything the black guy who came before him did. Last week saw him throwing more grenades into Obama-era programs with apparent disregard for the devastating effects they will have on Americans and the standing of our country in the world.

On the Sunday shows, representatives of the administration attempted to rationalize the actions by saying the president is unconventional (no kidding), and that he is just trying to force actions by Congress and our allies and opponents around the world. That may actually be true, but the odds are quite high that any actions that result will not be for the good of this country.

Fri
20
Oct

Letters to the Editor: On history, moral authority, contractors and the VA

Letters to the Editor

Letters to the Editor

Don’t erase history, but don’t deny it, either

Editor, The Beacon:

This is in reference to Mr. Preston Collum’s letter to the editor “Confederate monuments don’t extol slavery” in the Oct. 5-8 Beacon.

While I respect Mr. Collum’s right to expression, I want to voice some alternative views on Civil War history and Confederate monuments. I am not a history scholar, but that does not seem to deter my opinions, which follow.

I take particular issue with the statement that “Slavery was a thin thread tied to states’ rights, self-government, and economic liberty.” In fact, slavery, and its loyal companion, white supremacy, were underlying bases for events leading to the Civil War.

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