Business

Wed
27
Sep

Few banks want pot companies as customers, but First Green welcomes them

Not exactly a head shop — This photo of a Surterra Wellness medical-marijuana dispensary in Tampa shows more-or-less what the company's Deltona location will look like, once it opens early next year. The company’s dispensaries — which it calls "wellness centers" —  are designed to make people feel comfortable and emulate the "feeling of home." Each location has a “kitchen” that is meant to be a place of community gathering and a space to provoke the sharing of thoughts and ideas, Surterra spokeswoman Monica

Not exactly a head shop — This photo of a Surterra Wellness medical-marijuana dispensary in Tampa shows more-or-less what the company's Deltona location will look like, once it opens early next year. The company’s dispensaries — which it calls "wellness centers" —  are designed to make people feel comfortable and emulate the "feeling of home." Each location has a “kitchen” that is meant to be a place of community gathering and a space to provoke the sharing of thoughts and ideas, Surterra spokeswoman Monica Russell said. “The ‘garden’ is also a common feature in Surterra Wellness Centers, and that is where people can come to learn about medical cannabis products and be able to see which of Surterra’s products can help you #FindYourWellness,” she said.

PHOTO COURTESY SURTERRA WELLNESS

Even though Floridians can now access marijuana as medicine, entrepreneurs who wish to dispense the herb are finding things aren’t as easy as opening up a neighborhood drugstore when it comes to handling the finances.

There are loads of federal regulations on banking, and although Florida voters legalized medical marijuana in 2016, cannabis is still illegal under federal law.

As a result, most banks treat money earned from the sale of the plant or its products as dirty money, even in states where marijuana is legal.

DeLandite Lex Ford is senior vice president at Eustis-based First Green Bank. He said First Green is the only bank in Florida that serves these companies, at least openly.

“We have around $35 million in deposits related to the marijuana industry in our first year,” Ford said.

Not all of it is from dispensaries — the bank also serves lawyers and physicians who are involved in the marijuana industry.

Wed
27
Sep

Event planner finally opens showroom

PARTY-PLANNING WIZARD — Event planner Nancy Fabian stands in front of some of the accoutrements of her work that will be on display in a new showroom in Orange City for her business, Nancy’s Creations LLC, Event Stylist and Planner.

PARTY-PLANNING WIZARD — Event planner Nancy Fabian stands in front of some of the accoutrements of her work that will be on display in a new showroom in Orange City for her business, Nancy’s Creations LLC, Event Stylist and Planner.

PHOTOS COURTESY NANCY FABIAN

STYLISH ELEMENTS — On display in a new showroom will be examples of Nancy’s Creations table settings.

STYLISH ELEMENTS On display in a new showroom will be examples of Nancy’s Creations table settings.

After six years of working out of her home, event planner Nancy Fabian is opening a showroom in Orange City.

“I finally decided I needed a place for customers to come to,” Fabian recently told The Beacon. “Working from home, you’re not treated the same. It devalues my work. Now, with a showroom, I hope it will make everything more professional and looking nicer.”

Fabian is holding a grand opening of her showroom 4-7 p.m. this coming Saturday, Sept. 30.

Nancy’s Creations LLC, Event Stylist and Planner can plan and coordinate any kind of special event, from private birthday parties to larger affairs like wedding receptions and  corporate events and everything in between. Her services include providing decorations, table linens and centerpieces.

Wed
27
Sep

For sale: Museum gallery and theater

ON THE MARKET — The Museum of Art complex at 600 N. Woodland Blvd. is for sale, as the museum works toward consolidating its operations in Downtown DeLand. Stetson University has been renting the theater side of the building, but passed on buying the complex because the asking price was more than the university could handle.

ON THE MARKET — The Museum of Art complex at 600 N. Woodland Blvd. is for sale, as the museum works toward consolidating its operations in Downtown DeLand. Stetson University has been renting the theater side of the building, but passed on buying the complex because the asking price was more than the university could handle.

BEACON PHOTO/JOE CREWS 

The Museum of Art - DeLand has put its gallery complex at 600 N. Woodland Blvd. on the market as a vital step in eventually consolidating its operations in Downtown DeLand.

George Bolge, the museum’s chief executive officer, said the goal is to help build an art district in the Downtown area, where the museum already operates a satellite gallery.

“The museum already has agreed with the city to create an arts district Downtown, and a move will help with that,” Bolge said. “It will build more interest in the museum and help create a stronger draw for tourism.”

Bolge said all museums occasionally need to revitalize themselves as towns change and people change. However, Bolge said, while the move won’t happen before the complex sells, it is likely to happen eventually. If the building doesn’t sell, the move would just take longer, he said.

Wed
20
Sep

Daudel named director of Stetson’s Family Enterprise Center

New director— Sylvain Daudel has been tapped as the new director of Stetson University’s Family Enterprise Center. Daudel comes to Stetson from the EDHEC Business School in Lille and Nice, where for the past three years he headed the Family Business Center at what is widely considered one of the world’s top 20 business schools.

PHOTO COURTESY STETSON UNIVERSITY

New director— Sylvain Daudel has been tapped as the new director of Stetson University’s Family Enterprise Center. Daudel comes to Stetson from the EDHEC Business School in Lille and Nice, where for the past three years he headed the Family Business Center at what is widely considered one of the world’s top 20 business schools.

Stetson University’s School of Business Administration has named Sylvain Daudel as the new director of the Family Enterprise Center. Daudel will be responsible for promoting the program as a leader in the development of next-generation family-enterprise owners, leaders, and advisers through education, outreach and research.

“It is an honor to have Sylvain Daudel join our faculty,” said Neal Mero, Ph.D., dean and professor of management in the School of Business Administration. “He brings a wealth of experience in working with some of the most successful family businesses in the world.”

The School of Business Administration created the Family Enterprise Center in 1998 to address the challenges that family-owned and -managed businesses face. The program, which is housed in the Department of Management, serves as a catalyst to help family enterprises, especially the next generation and their advisers.

Wed
20
Sep

A 1920s throwback: New hotel aims to enhance historic tradition

Now open for business — The DeLand Hotel is at 442 E. New York Ave. After a year’s worth of renovations, the hotel has vintage touches that harken back to its 1925 roots.

Now open for business — The DeLand Hotel is at 442 E. New York Ave. After a year’s worth of renovations, the hotel has vintage touches that harken back to its 1925 roots.

BEACON PHOTOS/JOE CREWS

A couple with vision — Owner Ross Janke, right, and his fiancee, Ashley LaFond, want guests to experience a unique and special stay at The DeLand Hotel.

A couple with vision — Owner Ross Janke, right, and his fiancee, Ashley LaFond, want guests to experience a unique and special stay at The DeLand Hotel.

Welcoming sight — The front doors of The DeLand Hotel are flanked by the original retaining walls.

Welcoming sight — The front doors of The DeLand Hotel are flanked by the original retaining walls.

Ross Janke has a vision for his new DeLand Hotel at 442 E. New York Ave.: maintain the historical aspects of the three-story building as much as possible, even if some modernization is necessary.

“We want to bring something truly unique and special to DeLand,” Janke said. “That is our goal.”

To carry out that mission, Janke has retained the original claw-foot bathtubs in most of the rooms, installed the original doorknobs wherever he could, painted rooms in period colors, and installed carpeting that mimicked the styles and patterns of carpeting from the 1920s, among many other things.

A Tiffany-style lamp hangs over the receptionist’s counter. Signs at the reception desk and on the front and back doors use a font from that era, too, to continue the theme.

Wed
13
Sep

Experts provide practical approaches to sustainable business practices

THE MARKETER — Dr. Deborah Goldring, shown here leading a class at Stetson University, will address ways businesses can adapt their marketing to lessen the impacts on society and the environment, during a one-day seminar on business sustainability later this month.

THE MARKETER — Dr. Deborah Goldring, shown here leading a class at Stetson University, will address ways businesses can adapt their marketing to lessen the impacts on society and the environment, during a one-day seminar on business sustainability later this month.

PHOTOS COURTESY STETSON UNIVERSITY

THE ENVIRONMENTALIST — Dr. Wendy Anderson, who chairs Stetson’s Department of Environmental Science and Studies, believes businesses can minimize their environmental impact while still remaining successful.

THE ENVIRONMENTALIST — Dr. Wendy Anderson, who chairs Stetson’s Department of Environmental Science and Studies, believes businesses can minimize their environmental impact while still remaining successful.

Note: The Beacon learned Sept. 21 this event has been delayed. Stetson officials do not yet have a new date. We will keep you posted. 

As Central Florida’s population continues to grow rapidly, increasing strain is being placed on the region’s delicate ecosystems. A one-day seminar Friday, Sept. 22, will provide community and business leaders with innovative ways to enjoy the economic benefits of population growth while protecting the area’s natural resources.

The Business Case for Sustainability seminar at Stetson University’s historic Downtown DeLand campus will provide a practical, in-depth approach to sustainable business practices.

Wed
13
Sep

Growing larger: Counseling center expands office space, adds thrift store

OFFICIALLY OPEN — A ribbon was cut to officially open the Central Florida Pregnancy Center’s new, 4,200-square-foot thrift store at 3151 Howland Blvd. in Deltona. From left in the front row are volunteer store managers Paul Hoover and his wife, Judy Hoover, board members Katy Brown-Thibodeau and Luis Baez, board Treasurer Margarita Feuerbacher, Executive Director Cindy Johanson, and, partially hidden, Director of Development Lisa Burke.

OFFICIALLY OPEN — A ribbon was cut to officially open the Central Florida Pregnancy Center’s new, 4,200-square-foot thrift store at 3151 Howland Blvd. in Deltona. From left in the front row are volunteer store managers Paul Hoover and his wife, Judy Hoover, board members Katy Brown-Thibodeau and Luis Baez, board Treasurer Margarita Feuerbacher, Executive Director Cindy Johanson, and, partially hidden, Director of Development Lisa Burke.

BEACON PHOTO/JAN GIROUX

A Deltona ministry that helps women and their families deal with unplanned pregnancies recently unveiled offices that are twice the size as before, while also cutting a ribbon for a new thrift store that will help fund its mission.

The offices of Central Florida Pregnancy Center, which had occupied 2,100 square feet of space at 3151 Howland Blvd., now take up 4,200 square feet, Executive Director Cindy Johanson told The Beacon.

“We essentially started with a quarter of an 8,400-square-foot building, and now we occupy about half of that,” Johanson said. “The thrift store takes up another 4,200 square feet, all under one roof.”

The center dates back to 1992, and has operated continuously since then except for a nine-month period from July 2008 to March 2009. Johanson said the center underwent a reorganization during that time.

Wed
06
Sep

Sneak peek: Goodwill officials show off new store/job center

SHOWING FOLKS AROUND — On Aug. 30, Goodwill’s Jeremy Waller guides a tour of a new retail store and job center still under construction on North Woodland Boulevard in DeLand. The new facility is expected to open in mid-November.

SHOWING FOLKS AROUND — On Aug. 30, Goodwill’s Jeremy Waller guides a tour of a new retail store and job center still under construction on North Woodland Boulevard in DeLand. The new facility is expected to open in mid-November.

BEACON PHOTOS/MARSHA MCLAUGHLIN

Representatives of Goodwill Industries of Central Florida recently showed off a new store and employment center on DeLand’s north side, even though the facility is still under construction.

Led by Jeremy Waller, Goodwill’s fund-development manager, and architect Kelly Kleppin, owner/president of KLPNstudio, the Aug. 30 tour took business and government leaders around what is still basically an empty shell of a building at 1600 N. Woodland Blvd., just south of and across the street from a Walmart Supercenter.

The approximately 25,000-square-foot building will house a thrift store, donation drop-off and Job Connection Center, all under one roof, Goodwill officials said. The facility, expected to open before the end of this year, will replace a nearly 10,000-square-foot thrift store/drop-off site about a half-mile south.

Wed
06
Sep

Symposium offers professional development for women

STARRING ATTRACTION — U.S. Rep. Stephanie Murphy, who will be the headline speaker at a women’s professional-development symposium in DeLand this month, is just the second Vietnamese-American — and the first female of that ethnicity  — to be elected to Congress.

STARRING ATTRACTION — U.S. Rep. Stephanie Murphy, who will be the headline speaker at a women’s professional-development symposium in DeLand this month, is just the second Vietnamese-American — and the first female of that ethnicity  — to be elected to Congress.

PHOTO COURTESY STEPHANIE MURPHY

MAKING IT HAPPEN — Dr. Jenneffer Pulapaka, a DeLand podiatrist and restaurateur, founded the organization that is putting on a symposium that will help women grow and enhance their professional and personal lives.

MAKING IT HAPPEN — Dr. Jenneffer Pulapaka, a DeLand podiatrist and restaurateur, founded the organization that is putting on a symposium that will help women grow and enhance their professional and personal lives.

PHOTO COURTESY JENNEFFER PULAPAKA

Women searching for ways to improve their professional aspirations, goals and mission objectives can get a full day’s worth of inspiration at a symposium being held at Stetson University later this month.

A newly formed DeLand-based organization, Women Inspiring Change and Community Development, is staging the Saturday, Sept. 16, educational gathering to help foster better outcomes for women in their professional careers, advocacy work and personal lives, said Dr. Jenneffer Pulapaka, the founder of WICCD.

“Our five counties [Volusia and neighboring counties] have a leadership gap for women; it’s more like a resource desert,” Pulapaka said. “Everybody kept saying, ‘Do something about it,’ so I’m doing something about it. We need to teach valuable skills and lifelong lessons emphasizing that women’s rights are valuable to our society, and women can inspire positive change.”

Wed
30
Aug

Drive-in movie theater proposed for Orange City

IT WILL BE HERE — A pickup speeds by a sign marking the heavily wooded future site of a drive-in movie theater, if an Edgewater man’s dream becomes a reality in a year or so. As of Aug. 27, the sign was on the west side of Kentucky Avenue in Orange City, between Graves Avenue and State Road 472.

IT WILL BE HERE — A pickup speeds by a sign marking the heavily wooded future site of a drive-in movie theater, if an Edgewater man’s dream becomes a reality in a year or so. As of Aug. 27, the sign was on the west side of Kentucky Avenue in Orange City, between Graves Avenue and State Road 472.

BEACON PHOTO/JOE CREWS

An Edgewater man is considering building a drive-in movie theater in the northeast corner of Orange City.

Dan Engel wants to build the Stetson Drive-In on about 10 acres of some land he owns on the east side of Kentucky Avenue between Graves Avenue and State Road 472, said Sims Kline, who is acting as marketing consultant for the project that still might be at least a year from reality.

“Our location, adjacent to I-4 and S.R. 472, is ideal to serve folks in a wide area, including Volusia and nearby counties,” Engel said in a statement forwarded by Kline. “We will feature the latest first-run movies and be family-friendly with a playground, dog park, and many other amenities. We’ll also be high-tech, with digital high-definition visual projection and audio distribution systems.”

Kline, a childhood friend of Engel, added that “Dan thinks this is the right time and right place to develop a high-tech drive-in theater.”

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