Business

Wed
13
Jun

Church’s Chicken may not come to roost

NOT SO DRIVE-IN — This Sonic Drive-In on North Woodland Boulevard has been sitting empty since the restaurant closed a number of years ago. Barricades block the driveway that state transportation officials say cannot be used by motorists wanting to drive into the parking lot, only by those leaving.

NOT SO DRIVE-IN — This Sonic Drive-In on North Woodland Boulevard has been sitting empty since the restaurant closed a number of years ago. Barricades block the driveway that state transportation officials say cannot be used by motorists wanting to drive into the parking lot, only by those leaving.

BEACON PHOTOS/JOE CREWS

Access issues may keep Church’s Chicken from replacing a former drive-in restaurant at 1601 N. Woodland Blvd., on DeLand’s north side.

That’s the word from Shawn Eby, chief executive of Goalz Restaurant Group, which has been working toward putting the franchised chicken eatery on the site where a Sonic Drive-In closed several years ago.

“There’s a little bit of light at the end of the tunnel,” Eby told The Beacon earlier this week, after he spoke with officials with Atlanta-based Church’s. “We talked about turning and reconfiguring the restaurant to give the public better access.”

The Church’s folks were going to consider Eby’s proposals and get back to him soon, he said.

DeLand officials had approved the development plans and gave Goalz permission to apply for building permits. One was a driveway permit Goalz needed to obtain from the Florida Department of Transportation.

Wed
13
Jun

Stetson plans nearly $12M in improvements

WELL DONE — Stetson University President Wendy B. Libby accepts an Energy Excellence Award from Stephen Jones, a regional vice president of Cenergistic. The university’s energy-conservation partner presented the award for Stetson’s 17-percent reduction in carbon dioxide emissions over three years.

WELL DONE — Stetson University President Wendy B. Libby accepts an Energy Excellence Award from Stephen Jones, a regional vice president of Cenergistic. The university’s energy-conservation partner presented the award for Stetson’s 17-percent reduction in carbon dioxide emissions over three years.

PHOTO COURTESY STETSON UNIVERSITY

At its spring meeting, the Stetson University board of trustees announced the approval of the university’s annual budget plan that includes more than $11.7 million in capital improvements and expenditures for the university’s campuses in DeLand and at the College of Law in Gulfport.

In DeLand, the fiscal year 2018-19 funding will go toward finishing work on the renovation of the Carlton Union Building (CUB), home to the university’s student government and organization offices, Campus Life and Student Success offices, food services and the Commons dining area.

Since the trustees’ meeting, the CUB has opened the new student government and student organization area on the second floor that includes a new student lounge, student radio station, student-government offices and a unique meeting area called the “Garage.”

Wed
06
Jun

Two enter Stetson’s Accounting Hall of Fame

HALL OF FAMERS — The 2018 inductees, Maureen Breakiron-Evans and Vince Brenner, show off plaques indicating their selection to the Stetson University Accounting Hall of Fame.

PHOTO COURTESY STETSON UNIVERSITY

HALL OF FAMERS — The 2018 inductees, Maureen Breakiron-Evans and Vince Brenner, show off plaques indicating their selection to the Stetson University Accounting Hall of Fame.

Two Stetson community members were welcomed recently into the Stetson University Accounting Hall of Fame in recognition of their significant career accomplishments and contributions to the accounting program. Maureen Breakiron-Evans, Class of ’76 from Philadelphia and Clearwater, and Vince Brenner, Ph.D., of Port Orange, join nine previous honorees.

Breakiron-Evans, a member of the Stetson University board of trustees since 2013, is a CPA and earned her accounting degree from Stetson University and master’s degrees from Harvard Business School and Stanford University.

She went on to become a partner in the “Big Eight” firm Arthur Andersen, then took executive-level roles in other prominent companies.

Wed
06
Jun

Company connects restaurants and hungry patrons

YOU RANG? — Pictured above, Mobile Waiter Brittney Applegate delivers food from Smokin J’s BBQ & Catering to a regular customer, Keith Goodwin.

YOU RANG? — Pictured above, Mobile Waiter Brittney Applegate delivers food from Smokin J’s BBQ & Catering to a regular customer, Keith Goodwin.

PHOTOS COURTESY DELAND DELIVERY

YUM, YUM! — Keith Goodwin’s meal from Smokin J’s BBQ was pulled pork, with sides of mac & cheese and BBQ beans.

YUM, YUM! — Keith Goodwin’s meal from Smokin J’s BBQ was pulled pork, with sides of mac & cheese and BBQ beans.

PHOTOS COURTESY DELAND DELIVERY

Justin Ringer didn’t own a car when he first arrived at Stetson University, so he either had to catch a ride to pick up food or order something to be delivered. But the delivery choices were limited to pizza or Chinese food, and that quickly got old.

By his third semester, he had a car, but that still meant getting dressed to go out and eat.

But having a car provided another option. He placed an ad on Facebook, offering to deliver foods from local restaurants to other homebound students for $5 a pop. He was soon getting calls to deliver two to four meals at a time.

Ringer’s roommate, Geoffrey Cole, and a friend, Brandon Evanich, saw how successful Ringer was, and they wanted in.

“That’s where the idea was born,” Ringer recently told The Beacon. “I looked into the food-delivery business, and felt I could do things better.”

Wed
30
May

West Volusia Chamber launches Valor Awards

EYEING THE FLAMES — A firefighter with Volusia County Fire Rescue checks a fully involved blaze inside an internet cafe north of DeLand in early April. 

EYEING THE FLAMES — A firefighter with Volusia County Fire Rescue checks a fully involved blaze inside an internet cafe north of DeLand in early April. 

FILE PHOTOS COURTESY VOLUSIA COUNTY PROFESSIONAL FIREFIGHTERS

The West Volusia Regional Chamber of Commerce is launching a new signature community event, the First Responders Valor Awards, to honor emergency personnel from West Volusia for their bravery the previous year.

To be held annually, the first event will take place Oct. 17 at The Center at Deltona, but in future years will be held every April, said Shari Simmans, the Chamber’s executive director.

The Chamber will bring business and government representatives together to honor the men and women of most of West Volusia’s fire departments and the Sheriff’s Office who showed exceptional poise and courage in extraordinary circumstances in 2017. Notable first responders will be nominated by their peers, Simmans said.

Simmans told The Beacon that she had run a similar program at her previous Chamber in Alexandria, Virginia.

“It was one of our most anticipated events every year,” she said.

Wed
30
May

Holder Pest marks 40 years

PROUD OWNERS — Jerry and Natalie Holder pose by the newest service vehicle in their company’s fleet. On June 1, Holder Pest & Termite Control will have been in business 40 years.

PROUD OWNERS — Jerry and Natalie Holder pose by the newest service vehicle in their company’s fleet. On June 1, Holder Pest & Termite Control will have been in business 40 years.

BEACON PHOTO/JOE CREWS

Any business that survives and flourishes for four decades must be doing something right. Holder Pest & Termite Control certainly qualifies. The DeLand company, which also performs lawn services, marks its 40th anniversary in business June 1.

“We worked hard. We worked this territory for many years before starting our own company, so we knew a lot of people,” Jerry Holder told The Beacon.

Natalie Holder, Jerry’s wife, said their company is not like the corporate pest-control companies.

“It’s more of a local feeling, customer service-focused,” she said. “If somebody calls, they can talk to the owner. There are not so many levels of people to go through.”

Jerry said he got into the pest-control industry in 1969, working for one of those national companies. He rose through the ranks, eventually becoming a salesman.

“They gave me West Volusia because no one wanted it. They called it ‘Deadland,’” he said. “But it worked out good.”

Wed
23
May

Florida Hospital implements centralized scheduling

CONNECTING PATIENT AND HOSPITAL SERVICES — Scheduling agents in Florida Hospital’s new centralized scheduling office in Orange City help patients obtain and prepare for appointments for various services at all five Florida Hospitals in Volusia and Flagler counties.

CONNECTING PATIENT AND HOSPITAL SERVICES — Scheduling agents in Florida Hospital’s new centralized scheduling office in Orange City help patients obtain and prepare for appointments for various services at all five Florida Hospitals in Volusia and Flagler counties.

PHOTO COURTESY FLORIDA HOSPITAL

Florida Hospital recently opened a new centralized office at 1061 Medical Center Drive, Suite 111, in Orange City for patient scheduling, preregistration, insurance verification and outpatient authorization.

Preregistration is completed before arriving at the hospital for imaging, respiratory, cardiology, and nuclear medicine services. Agents will check patient insurance eligibility and determine any patient financial responsibility due at the time of service.

Patients can visit www.FHimaging.org to request an appointment with a scheduling agent to find the right provider and location or to view current available appointment times.

Patients interested in scheduling an appointment at either Florida Hospital Fish Memorial in Orange City or Florida Hospital DeLand can call toll-free 833-881-9081.

Wed
23
May

DeLand Nissan completes expansion

NOW WITH A CAPITAL ‘L’ — After many years without it, DeLand Nissan finally got the capital “L” in its name in May 2015. Owner Kurt Dye was finally able to convince the Nissan corporation, which actually owns the sign and had small-l “Deland” listed in its records, to agree to changing the lettering.

NOW WITH A CAPITAL ‘L’ — After many years without it, DeLand Nissan finally got the capital “L” in its name in May 2015. Owner Kurt Dye was finally able to convince the Nissan corporation, which actually owns the sign and had small-l “Deland” listed in its records, to agree to changing the lettering.

BEACON PHOTOS/JOE CREWS

BRIGHT AND COOL — DeLand Nissan last year completely renovated and upgraded its service department, including making it climate-controlled for the comfort of its employees.

BRIGHT AND COOL — DeLand Nissan last year completely renovated and upgraded its service department, including making it climate-controlled for the comfort of its employees.

It took the better part of eight years, but DeLand Nissan finally has completed a multimillion-dollar expansion of its showroom and parking lots at 2600 S. Woodland Blvd.

The latest stage of the project entailed adding paved space to park an additional 225 cars and trucks in the dealership’s inventory, said owner Kurt Dye.

“We also redesigned a driveway to allow for better truck access, so [the transporters] don’t have to back out,” Dye told The Beacon. “We also added irrigation, fencing and electrical work.”

The dealership now can accommodate an inventory of about 475 new cars and trucks and another 50 to 100 previously owned vehicles.

“We have a total of about 600 cars and trucks in our inventory,” Dye said. “We have the largest selection of trucks in the market.”

Wed
16
May

Stetson ethics team takes first, second at competition

IBECC 2018 TEAM — STETSON’S ETHICS TEAM — Stetson University students, from left, Regis Steighner, Megan Christopher, Alex Overdijking and Nathaniel Diamond won first- and second-place prizes at the International Business Ethics Case Competition (IBECC).

IBECC 2018 TEAM — STETSON’S ETHICS TEAM — Stetson University students, from left, Regis Steighner, Megan Christopher, Alex Overdijking and Nathaniel Diamond won first- and second-place prizes at the International Business Ethics Case Competition (IBECC).

PHOTO COURTESY STETSON UNIVERSITY

Stetson University students won first- and second-place prizes at the International Business Ethics Case Competition (IBECC) held in April in Boston. The undergraduate field of competitors across all brackets included 30 institutions from the U.S., Spain, Turkey, the United Kingdom, Kuwait, China and Australia.

The Stetson team consisted of Megan Christopher, Alex Overdijking, Nathaniel Diamond and Regis Steighner, and was coached by professors Jim Beasley, Ph.D., John Tichenor, Ph.D., and Areti Vogel, Ph.D. They competed against undergraduate teams in the three categories of the competition.

“The IBECC judges were very impressed with the polished presentation and argumentation skills displayed by all four students on our team,” said Beasley, a professor of management in the School of Business Administration who accompanied the team to Massachusetts.

Wed
16
May

Volusia tourism-industry leaders salute record numbers

SAVVY LEADERS — The staff of the West Volusia Tourism Advertising Authority poses for a photograph recently during a Tourism Week event. From left are Dena Scroggins, Kristine Spence and Executive Director Georgia Turner.

SAVVY LEADERS — The staff of the West Volusia Tourism Advertising Authority poses for a photograph recently during a Tourism Week event. From left are Dena Scroggins, Kristine Spence and Executive Director Georgia Turner.

BEACON PHOTO/JOE CREWS

DIGGING IN — Some of the “industry partners” chow down on a fried-fish dinner at a new outdoor event venue at Highland Park Fish Camp near DeLand. The dinner was part of the West Volusia celebration of National Travel & Tourism Week.

DIGGING IN — Some of the “industry partners” chow down on a fried-fish dinner at a new outdoor event venue at Highland Park Fish Camp near DeLand. The dinner was part of the West Volusia celebration of National Travel & Tourism Week.

BEACON PHOTO/JOE CREWS

OUT IN FORCE — Executive directors of Volusia County’s three tourism bureaus attended a tourism celebration in Daytona Beach hosted by the Lodging & Hospitality Association of Volusia County (LHA). From left are Lori Campbell Baker, Daytona Beach Area CVB; Georgia Turner, West Volusia Tourism Advertising Authority; Bob Davis, LHA president; Debbie Meihls, Southeast Volusia Advertising Authority; and John Betros, LHA chairman.

OUT IN FORCE — Executive directors of Volusia County’s three tourism bureaus attended a tourism celebration in Daytona Beach hosted by the Lodging & Hospitality Association of Volusia County (LHA). From left are Lori Campbell Baker, Daytona Beach Area CVB; Georgia Turner, West Volusia Tourism Advertising Authority; Bob Davis, LHA president; Debbie Meihls, Southeast Volusia Advertising Authority; and John Betros, LHA chairman.

PHOTO COURTESY DAYTONA BEACH AREA CVB

Events in Daytona Beach and West Volusia celebrated the record-breaking economic impact that tourism had in Volusia County in 2017 and helped mark National Travel & Tourism Week, which this year was May 6-12.

The May 9 events kicked off that morning with a crowd of about 200 at the new Hard Rock Hotel Daytona Beach, where attendees were given some eye-popping statistics.

According to the Daytona Beach Area Convention and Visitors Bureau, in 2017, overnight visitors spent a record-breaking $6.09 billion in Volusia County, an increase of better than 1.5 percent over the preceding year. Tourism generated an estimated 55,200 jobs overall with a $734 million payroll that grew by more than 33 percent over the previous year.

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