Business

Wed
24
May

Second Sporty’s Car Wash opens in West Volusia, a third to open later this year

Now open — Sporty’s Car Wash is now open at 1310 S. Volusia Ave. in Orange City, following a year of renovations and refurbishing. This is the third location for Sporty’s, which already has locations in south DeLand and St. Augustine and soon will have a fourth on DeLand’s north side.

Now open — Sporty’s Car Wash is now open at 1310 S. Volusia Ave. in Orange City, following a year of renovations and refurbishing. This is the third location for Sporty’s, which already has locations in south DeLand and St. Augustine and soon will have a fourth on DeLand’s north side.

BEACON PHOTO/JOE CREWS

Sporty’s Car Wash, which opened on DeLand’s south side more than four years ago, is growing in West Volusia.

Owner Gordon Hardwick said a Sporty’s Car Wash would be open in Orange City this week, and another car wash will open in about four months on DeLand’s north side.

The new sites are actually the third and fourth in the Sporty’s empire. The company opened a location in St. Augustine almost a year ago, Hardwick said.

The Orange City location is a complete renovation of what for many years was Blue Spring Car Wash at 1310 S. Volusia Ave. The north DeLand operation will replace DeLand Auto Spa at 104 E. International Speedway Blvd., next to a McDonald’s restaurant.

“It sort of happened innately,” Hardwick said of his growing chain. “The [former] operators were ready to sell. It was a good fit for everybody, and a win for the owners. It appears everybody is pleased with the outcome.”

Wed
24
May

All things textile: New arts center enlivens Downtown DeLand neighborhood

Artistic surroundings — Julie Scheurich, left, and Nancy Gear stand on the entry porch of a newly renovated house that is the home of Fabrications, a new fabric and yarn shop, fiber-arts gallery and studio in Downtown DeLand.

Artistic surroundings — Julie Scheurich, left, and Nancy Gear stand on the entry porch of a newly renovated house that is the home of Fabrications, a new fabric and yarn shop, fiber-arts gallery and studio in Downtown DeLand.

BEACON PHOTOS/JOE CREWS

Crafty ladies — Julie Scheurich, left, and Nancy Gear are the brains behind Fabrications, a new fabric and yarn shop, fiber-arts gallery and studio in Downtown DeLand.

Crafty ladies — Julie Scheurich, left, and Nancy Gear are the brains behind Fabrications, a new fabric and yarn shop, fiber-arts gallery and studio in Downtown DeLand.

Nancy Gear and Julie Scheurich often toiled at jobs that only occasionally required much creativity. But making original creations of cloth and yarn was never far from their minds.

“I’ve always been a sewist — that’s the current term — and I learned from my mother,” Scheurich said. “I went to art school and had jobs in writing and photography, but I was a legal assistant for too long, and I wanted to get back into artistic endeavors.”

Gear, too, had a number of art classes before becoming a librarian for about a dozen years, then deciding she missed working with fabrics.

“One of my favorite parts [of being a librarian] was making puppets, so this kind of goes with that,” Gear said.

So the two women eventually decided to pool their talents to give an outlet to their creativity and the creativity of others.

Thu
18
May

Stetson University researcher addresses growing threat to coastal communities

Girding for higher sea levels — Dr. Jason Evans, assistant professor of environmental science at Stetson University, is finding innovative ways for coastal communities to adapt to rising sea levels.

Girding for higher sea levels — Dr. Jason Evans, assistant professor of environmental science at Stetson University, is finding innovative ways for coastal communities to adapt to rising sea levels.

PHOTO COURTESY STETSON UNIVERSITY

Increased flooding caused by rising sea levels is a growing threat to coastal communities in the United States. In response, Jason M. Evans, Ph.D., assistant professor of environmental science and studies at Stetson University, is working with Sea Grant programs and several communities in the Southeast to discover ways to adapt to rising sea levels.

Evans’ research focuses on discovering vulnerabilities of public facilities such as stormwater drainage systems, fire stations and wastewater-treatment plants, and finding ways to help communities adapt to a rise in sea levels and become more resilient to coastal hazards. His research is in collaboration with Sea Grant programs in Florida, Georgia and North Carolina.

Last week in St. Petersburg, Evans took part in a Florida Sea Grant workshop focusing on the legal and policy challenges confronted by local governments as they face increased flooding and rising sea levels.

Wed
17
May

Building-supply store owner takes low-key approach to charitable work

Restored warbird — A restored Grumman TBF-1 Avenger torpedo bomber is parked in front of a DeLand Naval Air Station Museum hangar that was donated by All Quality Products and named for company owner Ron Herman.

Restored warbird — A restored Grumman TBF-1 Avenger torpedo bomber is parked in front of a DeLand Naval Air Station Museum hangar that was donated by All Quality Products and named for company owner Ron Herman.

Restored warbird — A restored Grumman TBF-1 Avenger torpedo bomber is parked in front of a DeLand Naval Air Station Museum hangar that was donated by All Quality Products and named for company owner Ron Herman.

Open-air workspace — A display featuring information about the pilot who was flying the Avenger when it caught fire over Lake Michigan in 1943 occupies one corner of an assembly pavilion donated to the DeLand Naval Air Station aviation museum by Ron Herman and All Quality Products.

BEACON PHOTOS/MARSHA MCLAUGHLIN

Ron Herman doesn’t support charitable causes in order to reap accolades. No, the owner of All Quality Products, a building-supply store in DeLand that marked its 40th anniversary in business May 13, does it to support a community that has helped his business — and him — succeed for four decades.

Herman gets pleasure from the appreciation of those he has helped, whether it’s an organization that helps people get their own home or former Little League players who visit him years after they’ve left the ball field.

“I was accepted in this wonderful world in DeLand [by people] who became not just good customers but also good friends,” he said in a recent interview in his office at the store on West Minnesota Avenue. “It’s my turn to give back to the community, and I am intent on doing that.”

Wed
10
May

Cress to change to special-events-only dining

Digging in — This is just part of the Feb. 26 crowd assembled for “7 Courses 7 Countries,” an international meal featuring dishes inspired by the cuisine of countries in the Middle East and Africa that were identified in a court-blocked executive order issued by President Donald Trump restricting immigration.

Digging in — This is just part of the Feb. 26 crowd assembled for “7 Courses 7 Countries,” an international meal featuring dishes inspired by the cuisine of countries in the Middle East and Africa that were identified in a court-blocked executive order issued by President Donald Trump restricting immigration.

BEACON FILE PHOTO/JOE CREWS

 

The award-winning Cress Restaurant, at 103 W. Indiana Ave. in Downtown DeLand, will begin blazing a new epicurean path at the end of the summer.

On the restaurant’s ninth anniversary Aug. 29, owners Hari and Jenneffer Pulapaka will begin operating as a ticketed-event-only eatery, serving up “globally inspired food” emphasizing “quality local and sustainable ingredients” four or five times a month rather than the current three nights a week.

Until then, however, Cress will keep to its current schedule of being open Thursday, Friday and Saturday evenings, except for a few occasions over the next three-plus months, Jenneffer Pulapaka said.

“We’ve been doing the same thing for nine years, and we just want to increase our diversity,” she said. “[This change] inspires us to do more creative things, and push the envelope for our guests and offer them different things.”

Wed
10
May

Stetson business majors take second in international ethics competition

Successful debaters — These Stetson University business majors — from left, Alex Overdijking, Megan Christopher, Sarah Klass and Nate Smith — recently came in second in an international business-ethics case competition in California.

Successful debaters — These Stetson University business majors — from left, Alex Overdijking, Megan Christopher, Sarah Klass and Nate Smith — recently came in second in an international business-ethics case competition in California.

PHOTO COURTESY STETSON UNIVERSITY

A team of Stetson University students placed second in its division in the International Business Ethics Case Competition (IBECC) held in April in Santa Monica, California.

The winning team for the Full Presentation was from the University of Illinois. The undergraduate field of competitors across all brackets hailed from 24 institutions in the United States, Spain and Australia.

“The IBECC judges were very impressed with the polished presentation and argumentation skills displayed by all four students on our team,” said Areti Vogel, instructor of management at Stetson University, who accompanied the team to California.

Team members were Megan Christopher, Sarah Klass, Alex Overdijking and Nate Smith, who were coached by Vogel and Jim Beasley, Ph.D., professor of management in Stetson’s School of Business Administration.

Wed
03
May

New regional CEO named for hospital system

New regional CEO — David Ottati is the new chief executive officer for the Florida Hospital region that includes Volusia, Lake and Flagler counties.

New regional CEO — David Ottati is the new chief executive officer for the Florida Hospital region that includes Volusia, Lake and Flagler counties.

PHOTO COURTESY ADVENTIST HEALTH SYSTEM

Adventist Health System has appointed David Ottati, current CEO for Florida Hospital Waterman, to serve effective May 1 in a new role as president/CEO of the Central Florida Division - North Region, formerly known as the Florida Hospital East Florida Region.

“The recent passing of our friend and colleague, Rob Fulbright, has left a permanent void in our hearts that will never be filled. There were many plans and projects that Rob was pursuing and it is important that we honor him by prayerfully selecting an executive leader that will advance Rob’s vision, as well as accelerate a seamless transition,” Terry Shaw, Adventist Health System president and CEO, said in a news release.

Adventist Health System’s Central Florida Division is now composed of two halves: North Region and South Region.

Wed
03
May

Despite low unemployment, CareerSource still has a role

Mapping things — Lead business-services representative Bill O’Connor explains a new computerized program that “maps” where jobs are and which companies are offering them, during a recent open house at CareerSource Flagler-Volusia’s Orange City center. The program also has details about job-seekers statewide who are registered with the workforce-development agency.

Mapping things — Lead business-services representative Bill O’Connor explains a new computerized program that “maps” where jobs are and which companies are offering them, during a recent open house at CareerSource Flagler-Volusia’s Orange City center. The program also has details about job-seekers statewide who are registered with the workforce-development agency.

BEACON PHOTOS/JOE CREWS

Volusia County’s unemployment rate was 5.0 percent in February, very close to what most economists consider to be full employment. But that doesn’t mean the local workforce-development agency, CareerSource Flagler-Volusia, is out of a job, according to its president and CEO.

“We continue to work with individuals looking for employment, whether it’s a better job or full-time rather than part-time,” Robin King said during a recent open house at the agency’s Orange City center. “We’re also working with businesses to help them retain their existing workforce and provide training so they can expand their existing workforce.”

Wed
26
Apr

Urgent-care center to open soon

Work in progress — The exterior awaits a coat of stucco while interior renovations continued recently at what will be a MedExpress urgent-care center at 1328 N. Woodland Blvd. in DeLand. This will be the 22nd facility in Florida for the growing West Virginia-based chain.

Work in progress The exterior awaits a coat of stucco while interior renovations continued recently at what will be a MedExpress urgent-care center at 1328 N. Woodland Blvd. in DeLand. This will be the 22nd facility in Florida for the growing West Virginia-based chain.

BEACON PHOTO/JOE CREWS

Similar in appearance — This typical MedExpress facility shows some of the design features that will influence the architecture of the company’s new urgent-care center on North Woodland Boulevard in DeLand.

Similar in appearance — This typical MedExpress facility shows some of the design features that will influence the architecture of the company’s new urgent-care center on North Woodland Boulevard in DeLand.

PHOTO COURTESY MEDEXPRESS

MedExpress, a growing Morgantown, West Virginia-based chain of urgent-care centers, is getting ready to open a facility at 1328 N. Woodland Blvd. in DeLand.

The new center will be the chain’s 22nd facility in Florida, opening two weeks after one in Golden Gate, near Naples in Southwest Florida, said MedExpress spokeswoman Annie Jamieson. Another half-dozen or so centers around the state are listed as “coming soon” on the company’s website.

“We’ll have an open house [in DeLand] May 23 from noon to 2 p.m.,” Jamieson said. “It will be open to the public, and they can tour the facility and meet the team working there.”

The first patients will be seen the following day, she added. All MedExpress centers are open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. seven days a week.

Wed
26
Apr

Florida Hospital Fish Memorial performs decontamination drill

Treating a ‘victim’ — Florida Hospital Fish Memorial registered nurse Erin Shehata, left, and Dr. Michelle Ramia, right, care for one of the student volunteers from University High School during a mock emergency-response decontamination drill April 7.

Treating a ‘victim’ Florida Hospital Fish Memorial registered nurse Erin Shehata, left, and Dr. Michelle Ramia, right, care for one of the student volunteers from University High School during a mock emergency-response decontamination drill April 7.

PHOTOS COURTESY FLORIDA HOSPITAL FISH MEMORIAL

Removing contaminants — Jimmy Rainey, a volunteer from the Volusia County Medical Reserve Corps, is scrubbed down by Melanie Robinson, Florida Hospital Fish Memorial emergency-management specialist and team lead for the exercise, to remove any contaminants on his personal protective equipment, during a full-scale emergency-response decontamination drill on April 7 at the Orange City hospital.

Removing contaminantsJimmy Rainey, a volunteer from the Volusia County Medical Reserve Corps, is scrubbed down by Melanie Robinson, Florida Hospital Fish Memorial emergency-management specialist and team lead for the exercise, to remove any contaminants on his personal protective equipment, during a full-scale emergency-response decontamination drill on April 7 at the Orange City hospital.

Florida Hospital Fish Memorial successfully conducted a full-scale emergency-response decontamination drill April 7.

The premise of the fictitious emergency scenario was a car accident on I-4 near Exit 111 involving students taking a field trip to Orlando. In the scenario, a truck carrying 25 50-gallon drums of the chemical glutaraldehyde sideswiped a Volusia County school van with six students and a teacher from University High School riding inside. The teacher was not harmed, but all six of the students were soaked with the chemicals and were transported to Florida Hospital Fish Memorial for care.

For this exercise, 10 students and a teacher from University High School’s biomedical-education classes volunteered to participate.

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