This story brought to you for free by:

Marriott gets brick, but not real brick

And the ‘Brick’ goes on — Strips of dark red on the first floor of Downtown DeLand’s new Courtyard by Marriott hotel are the long-awaited “brick” that was supposed to adorn the ground level. However, this brick is faux brick, fashioned from painted stucco.

And the ‘Brick’ goes on — Strips of dark red on the first floor of Downtown DeLand’s new Courtyard by Marriott hotel are the long-awaited “brick” that was supposed to adorn the ground level. However, this brick is faux brick, fashioned from painted stucco.

BEACON PHOTO/ERIKA WEBB

And, the colors are correct, city says

 

As promised, there is brick on the facade of the Courtyard by Marriott hotel under construction in Downtown DeLand.

But not real brick.

The building already looms unappealing to many locals who see five stories of orange and mustard, offset — barely — by strips of off-white. 

Unimpressed observers expected more sedate, blend-worthy hues from the City Commission-approved palette of Sherwin-Williams’ Copper Harbor, Convivial Yellow, Sequin and Dover White paint colors.

And, those locals have been asking, where is the brick that is supposed to adorn the first floor?

On Jan. 3, workers huddled in doorways at the unfinished Marriott as cold rain splattered the exterior, now additionally festooned with strips of what looks like russet paint covering gray stucco.

“It’s not brick; we know that,” City of DeLand Chief Building Official Patrick Hubbard confirmed. “There’s a base coat of stucco on block, and they add oxide to the stucco mix and float a coating over the stucco.”

Gouging down to the base coat reveals lines of gray stucco and gives the effect of brick, Hubbard added.

This brick effect is perfectly acceptable, according to Rick Werbiskis, community-development director for the City of DeLand. 

Whether to use real or replicated brick was the builder’s call when the City Commission approved the Marriott facade, Werbiskis and Hubbard said. 

“The Planning Board and the HPB [Historic Preservation Board] did not specify what type of materials,” Werbiskis said. “They just looked at colors.”

“The city was more interested in the color,” he added.

Despite criticism from some in the community, the exterior walls do indeed reflect the City Commission-approved shades, Werbiskis said.

“Their attorney, working through their contractor, confirmed the correct pigmentation. … Their contractor confirmed the various [color] IDs, keys were the same as the colors approved by the city,” Werbiskis said.

For better or worse, the brick — simulated though it may be — goes on.  

— Erika Webb, erika@beacononlinenews.com 

Rate this article: 
Average: 3.5 (12 votes)